What's the Opposite?

by Oliver Jeffers

A small Huey gets a lesson in opposites from a big Huey. The opposite of “up”... read more

A small Huey gets a lesson in opposites from a big Huey. The opposite of “up” (a pink cat climbs a tree) is “down” (cat does not come down from tree). The opposite of “high” (cat is still up in tree) is “low” (the bigger Huey cuts down tree with a saw). “Happy” is the small Huey finding a coin to buy a colorful drink (yay!). “Sad” is the drink dropped on the ground and spilled (boo!). The droll scenarios showcase a range of opposites (here and there, hot and cold, on and off) that sometimes veers into the charmingly less concrete, as when “unlucky” (small Huey stranded on an island under the hot sun) becomes “lucky” (a box floating by has a fan inside), only to become “unlucky” again (the fan requires electricity). The Hueys, ovals with faces and stick figure arms and legs, are drawn in pencil with punctuations of color in a book that can both amuse and stretch young children. (Ages 3–6)

© Cooperative Children's Book Center, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 2017

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