Skunkdog

by Emily Jenkins and Pierre Pratt

“Dumpling was a dog of enormous enthusiasm, excellent obedience skills —and... read more

“Dumpling was a dog of enormous enthusiasm, excellent obedience skills —and very little nose.” In spite of the description of our main character in the opening line, the illustration shows her as having quite a remarkable proboscis. In fact, she more closely resembles an anteater than a dog. What we soon learn, though, is that Dumpling has a very weak sense of smell—a disadvantage for any dog. Since she can’t smell anything, she has no interest in sniffing anything, including other dogs, and consequently she has no dog friends. For Dumpling’s owners, it’s a particular disadvantage because she can’t seem to stay away from skunks. Several unfortunate encounters with a local skunk earn her eponymous nickname, Skunkdog. But Dumpling doesn’t care, and she actually becomes quite friendly with a skunk who takes up residence in her doghouse. Emily Jenkins’s wry text is well complemented by Pierre Pratt’s humorous cartoon-style illustrations. (Ages 4–7)

© Cooperative Children's Book Center, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 2009

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