Spoon

by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and Scott Magoon

Spoon has interesting relatives. There’s elegant Aunt Silver, whom he visits... read more

Spoon has interesting relatives. There’s elegant Aunt Silver, whom he visits on Sundays, and his well-known great-grandmother, who “fell in love with a dish and ran off to a distant land.” But lately Spoon has been feeling his life is boring compared to that of other eating utensils. Take Knife—not only is he able to cut, but he can also spread. Fork gets to travel to outdoor grills. And everyone thinks Chopsticks are special. Just as Spoon is lamenting his limitations, his friends are cataloging his perks: Spoon is allowed to be silly, but everyone is serious when they’re using Knife; Spoon is able to measure, but not Fork; the Chopsticks are required to work in tandem, whereas Spoon can go solo. Spoon’s mother reminds him of other ways he’s special, too. He can dive into a bowl of ice cream, for example, and relax in a hot beverage. Reassured, Spoon drifts off to a night of sweet dreams. Quirky illustrations include an image of the youngster “spooning” with his parents in a flatware caddy during a restless night. (Ages 3–8)

© Cooperative Children's Book Center, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 2010

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